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Call for panels and papers: “Religion, Politics, and the Public Sphere: Contesting Liberalism?” (ECPR General Conference, Oslo, 6-9 September 2017)

Call for panels and papers: “Religion, Politics, and the Public Sphere: Contesting Liberalism?” (ECPR General Conference, Oslo, 6-9 September 2017)

Call for panels and papers
ECPR General Conference (Oslo, 6-9 September 2017)
https://ecpr.eu/Events/EventDetails.aspx?EventID=96
Section on “Religion, Politics, and the Public Sphere: Contesting Liberalism?”
Convenors: Luca Ozzano, University of Turin (luca.ozzano@unito.it) and Anja Hennig, Europa-Universität Viadrina (ahennig@europa-uni.de)
Deadline: 15 February 2017

Panel and paper proposal must be submitted online through the ECPR website. Prospective panel convenors are also required to contact by email the two section convenors, possibly by the end of December 2016.

Section Abstract
Liberal principles such as autonomy, freedom and equality have always been challenging conservative thought. In particular they are disputed or rejected by traditionalists and fundamentalists within all major religions. At the same time and often within the same state or society, progressive religious traditions tend to embrace liberal principles such as freedom of choice in moral issues and sometimes even consider religion a merely private matter. However, especially with regard to the accommodation of Islam, also local or state governments sometimes touch the boundaries of liberalism.

Such dynamics have become particularly evident since the late 20th century with what some call the ‘revenge of god’ or ‘deprivatization of religion’, making religion again a relevant factor in the public sphere of most contemporary societies, liberal democracies included. Whereas in the 1990s academic debates focused mostly on the role of Catholicism in the most recent waves of democratization, after 9/11 and the subsequent events attention has mostly shifted to investigate the compatibility between Islam and democracy. Moreover, the presence of religious actors in the public sphere, and the rise of public debates on issues such as bioethics, LGBT issues, and the role of religious symbols in the public sphere, have also given rise to a growing corpus of studies on the so-called morality politics. On the other hand, in the international field, we have witnessed the relevance of religion in conflict, violence and terrorism, but also in dialogue and in new patterns of civil society-based cooperation, as well as in international relations and international judicial bodies such as the ECHR.

Such processes have also significantly changed the way both common people and social scientists look at the world, sparking lively debates on what liberalism, modernization and secularization mean, and how religion can be accommodated in the context of contemporary democracies. Particular emphasis has been put on the role religious actors play in the public sphere. Studies have focused on the role of religious movements, both at the national and the transnational level, on religiously oriented political parties, and on the role of religious institutions, such as the Catholic Church, in political affairs. In the domestic field, scholarly attention has focused particularly on the role of religious values and religious actors in democratization processes, in theoretical terms and in relation to specific religious traditions.

There is, however, still need to investigate more systematically the motives, strategies and consequences of religious agency in the public spheres. Against this background, this Section investigates the various tensions between religious actors (but also religious ideas, values or ideologies), political discourse or action and liberalism(s).

The Section will address the following issues:

1. Morality policy, gender relations and religion
This subsection invites studies which analyze the religious factor in political conflicts about “fundamental questions” concerning life, death, and family patterns. The focus will be on gender-related issues such as abortion, marriage equality and LGBTQI rights, as well as on other bioethics issues and euthanasia.

2. Governmental religious policies and religious pluralism
This subsection focuses on how states, local or federal governments, religious parties or transnational organizations behave vis-à-vis religion or govern religious pluralism, and Islam in particular. This includes conceptual studies on secularism or multiculturalism such as the analysis of policies dealing with religious symbols in the public spheres, religious education, welfare or exception rules on religious grounds. This subsection will also try to define what citizenship can mean in a religious pluralist context.

3. Religion as source for (international) conflicts or factor for democratization
This subsection addresses scholars who analyze the various roles of religious actors in local, regional or transnational (merely interreligious or interethnic) conflicts. This includes on the one hand actors clearly contesting liberalism such as fundamentalist religious movements or terrorist groups. On the other hand, studies are addressed, which scrutinize religious civil societal initiatives involved in conflict solution and democratization processes, such as constitution writing.

4. (Post)secularization, religion and liberal democracy in political theory and empirical analysis
This subsection reflects upon the normative discourses on (post)secularization, and, thus, about the role religion should play in the public spheres of secularizing and/or de-secularizing democracies. This includes also approaches dealing with illiberalism and norm diffusion.

5. Religious Actors in Comparative Perspective
This subsection deals more systematically with the role of religious actors in contemporary polities: particularly, the focus will be on both political parties with a religious orientation, and national and transnational religious institutions, organizations and movements. Panels included in it will both analyze them in comparative perspective, and investigate their role in policy making, public debates, economic processes, and welfare.

Panels and Papers may address these issues merely empirically, theoretically or combine both perspectives. Also comparative, sociological and historical approaches are welcome. Given that liberal ideas are spread and contested worldwide there is by no means a restriction to the “global West” or to traditional liberal democracies.

Call for papers: “European Secularization: Views from Turkey and Israel” (ECPR conference, Prague 2016)

Call for papers: “European Secularization: Views from Turkey and Israel” (ECPR conference, Prague 2016)

Call for papers for the ECPR general conference 2016 in Prague for the section: Religious and Political Affiliation in Comparative European Perspective”, for a prospective panel entitled “European Secularization: Views from Turkey and Israel”.

Turkey and Israel can be described as diametrically opposed, a secular state “imposed” on a religious population (Turkey) and a religious state imposed on a secular population (Israel). But, in fact both countries engage with questions regarding the role of religion in public and private lives and are in search for accommodation. In this proposed panel the questions of secularism and post-secularism will be discussed from a perspective of two countries on the fringes of Europe, where religion performs an important yet contested role.

If interested, send a short title to GUy Ben-Porat (Ben Gurion University of the Negev) at gbp@som.bgu.ac.il

Research Sessions 2016 – Call for Proposals

Research Sessions 2016 – Call for Proposals

The 2016 ECPR Research Sessions will take place at Radboud University Nijmegen, from 28 June – 1 July 2016.

The Research Sessions offers established collaborative groups the opportunity to step away from their hectic work schedules and focus on commencing, or completing, their research in an environment conducive to concentrated discussion.

The proposal, which should be no longer than 3000 words, should specify the research question and locate it within the relevant scientific debate and theories. It should include:

the guiding hypothesis;
the main ‘message’ or the major and innovative contribution that the research group wants to make;
methodology;
data;
research steps;
milestones;
a rough publication plan; and
a list of members.

The deadline is 23 February 2016. For more information on criteria for groups and proposals please see our website. To submit your proposal, click here. For any further questions please email researchsessions@ecpr.eu

Call for sections: 2016 ECPR Graduate Student Conference

Call for sections: 2016 ECPR Graduate Student Conference

The next Graduate Student Conference will take place at the University of Tartu in Estonia from 10-13 July 2016. The Call for Sections is open until 30 September, and the board of the standing group on ‘religion and politics’ invites young scholars to propose a section related to our field of expertise.

If you have any questions about the conference, please don’t hesitate to contact the conference organization at graduateconference@ecpr.eu and/or the standing group convenor, Prof. Jeff Haynes, at jeff.haynes@londonmet.ac.uk.

http://ecpr.eu/Events/EventDetails.aspx?EventID=98

Call for Panels and Papers for the General Conference

Call for Panels and Papers for the General Conference

The ECPR’s General Conference is its largest event, often bringing together some 2,500 political scientists from throughout the world. The 2015 Conference is taking place at Université de Montréal – the ECPR’s first ever event to be held outside of Europe.

The list of Sections has been finalised; and the call is open for Full Panels and individual Papers. Since this is a combined stage, individuals are able to propose to a Section, either a Panel including 4 – 5 Papers or individual Papers. Further information explaining the stages in detail can be found in the Guidelines.

The deadline for Panel and Paper submissions is 16 February 2015. If you have any further questions, please email the General Conference Team (generalconference@ecpr.eu).

Could you shape the future of the ECPR? 

Could you shape the future of the ECPR? 

For the last 44 years the ECPR has been instrumental in shaping the development of the political science discipline. With a portfolio of major international events, highly ranked publications, prestigious prizes and an institutional membership that is growing year on year, the ECPR remains at the cutting edge of political science and is the association for all involved in its study.

By the end of March 2015, the term of office will expire for five Executive Committee members who were elected in 2009, and for two Executive Committee members who were co-opted to vacancies following the 2012 election.

Now is your opportunity to shape the future of the ECPR by nominating yourself to join the Executive Committee.

If you think you have what’s needed to take the ECPR forward for the next six years you can nominate yourself via the ECPR website. Please see the 2015 EC Election guidelines for a full description of each stage of the election and the eligibility criteria. The Nomination stage opened on 15 October and closes on 15 November 2014.

ECPR Research Sessions 2015: Proposals now being accepted

ECPR Research Sessions 2015: Proposals now being accepted

Radboud University Nijmegen 30 June – 3 July 2015

The Research Sessions offers established collaborative groups the opportunity to step away from their hectic work schedules and focus on commencing, or completing, their research in an environment suitable for concentrated discussion.

Click here for further information.

Deadline for proposals: 23 February 2015

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